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publicado em 06/07/2010 às 19h00:00
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Changes of steroid hormone are related to competitiveness in men

A new study reveals different hormone levels in our two closest relatives, bonobos and chimpanzees

 
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Foto: Divulgação/Bonobohandshake
Foto: Divulgação/Bonobohandshake
Tory Wobbe collecting saliva of a young bonobo Lola ya Bonobo Sanctuary in Congo A female bonobo asking an adult male to share
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Tory Wobbe collecting saliva of a young bonobo Lola ya Bonobo Sanctuary in Congo
A female bonobo asking an adult male to share

About half of men experience hormonal changes similar to bonobos and chimpanzees, monkeys with similar structure to that of man, before a competition or a "state efforts", say researchers from Duke and Harvard Universities.

A new study reveals different hormone levels in our two closest relatives, bonobos and chimpanzees, in anticipation of competition. From the collection of saliva, the researchers measured the hormone levels before and after stressful situations and competition.

They found that males showed hormonal changes in anticipation of running for the food, but bonobos and chimpanzees were totally different in that released hormones.

Male chimpanzees showed an increase in testosterone, which is expected to prepare the animals for competition or aggressive interactions. In contrast, bonobos showed an increase in cortisol, which is associated with stress and social strategies more passive in other animals.

Men usually experience an increase in cortisol before many types of competition, similar to bonobos. However, if men have what is called a "cause for high power, or a strong desire to achieve high status, they experience an increase in testosterone levels before a competition, like the chimpanzees.

"These results suggest that changes in steroid hormone, which is correlated with the competitive drive of men, are shared by descent with other primates," said Victoria Wobbe, a graduate student at Harvard.

While some men may appear more and more bonobos chimps, something unique about humans is that males, after the competition, experience an increase testosterone if you win, or a reduction of this hormone is lost.

"It's exciting because we can see that in some respects are similar to those of bonobos, in others, we are similar to chimpanzees," said anthropologist Brian Hare Duke, co-author. "But then there is also a part of our biology that appears to be entirely original."

Source: Isaude.net
   Palavras-chave:   Hormones    Growth hormone    Chimpanzees    Bonobos    Stress    Competition   
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