Science and Technology
publicado em 05/07/2013 às 11h29:00
   Dê o seu voto:

Potential antibiotic targets a bacterial enzyme critical to metabolic processes

University of Adelaide research has produced a antibiotic which could help in the battle against bacterial resistance

 
font size
A-
A+

University of Adelaide research has produced a potential new antibiotic which could help in the battle against bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

The potential new antibiotic targets a bacterial enzyme critical to metabolic processes.

The compound is a protein inhibitor which binds to the enzyme (called biotin protein ligase), stopping its action and interrupting the life cycle of the bacteria.

"Existing antibiotics target the bacterial cell membranes but this potential new antibiotic operates in a completely different way," says Professor Andrew Abell, project leader and Acting Head of the University's School of Chemistry and Physics.

Professor Abell says the compound, although at a very early stage of development - it has not yet been tested on an animal model - has the potential to become the first of a new class of antibiotics.

"Bacteria quickly build resistance against the known classes of antibiotics and this is causing a significant global health problem," he says.

"Preliminary results show that this new class of compound may be effective against a wide range of bacterial diseases, including tuberculosis which has developed a strain resistant to all known antibiotics."

Developing the new protein inhibitor involved a novel approach called 'in situ click chemistry'. A selection of small molecules, or 'precursor fragments', are presented to the bacteria in a way so that the target protein enzyme itself builds the inhibiting compound and also binds with it.

"In a sense the bacteria unwittingly chooses a compound that will stop its growth and assembles it - like building a weapon and using it against itself," says Professor Abell. "We've gone a step further to specifically engineer the enzyme so that it builds the best and most potent weapon."

"Our results are promising. We've made the compounds; we know they bind and inhibit this enzyme and we've shown they stop the growth of a range of bacteria in the laboratory. The next critical step will be investigating their efficacy in an animal model."

"Thanks to this new approach what might have taken a year or more with a range of sequential experiments, we can now do in one single experiment," Professor Abell says.

The research has been published in the journal Chemical Science and is in collaboration with researchers at Monash University and Adelaide's Women's and Children's Hospital.

Source:
  • Share this pageShare this page
  • Share this pageCorrect
  • ShareShare
  • AlertAlert
Reduced link: 
  • You are recommending this story: Potential antibiotic targets a bacterial enzyme critical to metabolic processes
  • Fill in the following form to send your recommendation to your friend:

  • You are suggesting a correction for this story: Potential antibiotic targets a bacterial enzyme critical to metabolic processes


Receba notícias do iSaúde no seu e-mail de acordo com os assuntos de seu interesse.
Seu nome:
Seu email:
Desejo receber um alerta com estes assuntos:
new antibiotic    battle against bacterial resistance    bacterial resistance    metabolic processes    University of Adelaide    Andrew Abell   
Comments:
Comment
Leave your comment
Close
(Required fields are marked with an *)

(Your email address will never be published or shared.)

Enter the letters and numbers below and click in the button "send"

  • Twitter iSaúde
advertising
Informe Saúde printed version

Recommend the portal
Close [X]
  • You are recommending this story: http://www.isaude.net
  • Fill in the following form to send your recommendation to your friend:

RSS news from the portal  iSaúde.net
Get the newsletter of the portal  iSaúde.net
Recommend the portal iSaúde.net
News from  iSaúde.net in your blog or website.
Get news on the subject of your interest.
© 2000-2011 www.isaude.net Todos os direitos reservados.