Science and Technology
publicado em 21/10/2011 às 15h16:00
   Dê o seu voto:

Nobel Prize-winning discovery is tested for avian influenza in Brazil

Technique of "RNA interference" allowed the study of functions of specific genes and combat various genetic diseases

 
font size
A-
A+

Some pieces of information on this page may have been automatically translated. Makernews is not responsible for the irregularities resulting from these translations. When in doubt,      consult the original text.



Foto: Divulgação/Bunge
Foto: Arne Deder/Landov
Helena Ferreira Lage, responsible for research Craig C. Mello and Andrew Z. Fire
  « Previous
next »  
Helena Ferreira Lage, responsible for research
Craig C. Mello and Andrew Z. Fire

A technique developed in the United States in 1998 is now being used by a Brazilian researcher in poultry to control a virus that causes viral respiratory disease that causes great losses to the poultry industry. The method for controlling the expression of genes, called RNA interference - created by Americans Andrew Z. Fire and Craig C. Mello - enabled the study of the functions of specific genes, helping to develop treatments for a range of genetic diseases, which earned them the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 2006.

The pair realized that by introducing, in the reproductive organs of the worm Caenorhabditis elegans, RNA molecules corresponding to a given arthropod muscle protein, the descendants writhed in a peculiar way. This same trend was observed in modified worms engineered to lack the gene that synthesizes the protein. Thus the scientists concluded that RNA molecules were able to inactivate the gene of the worm, inhibiting the production of the protein responsible for the production of a muscle it, without directly altering their DNA.

In the PhD study, the researcher Helena Ferreira Lage decided to see if the technique was also able to inhibit the replication of avian metapneumovirus (AMPV). Introducing RNA molecules into target regions of the genome of AMPV in the cells of infected birds, the researcher noted that the technique was also able to inhibit almost 100% replication of the virus. Until now this technique had been applied only to inhibit human viruses, and after this work, there were several others applying the same technology to prevent replication of avian viruses, Lage said.

Despite the good results obtained with this technique in poultry, it is not yet being used in industry due to high cost. On the other hand, is being studied to inhibit the replication of human metapneumovirus, which is the same kind of aviary. These RNA molecules are not yet being sold, because they represent a new technology. But already in the experimental stage and soon will reach pharmacies for the treatment of respiratory diseases in humans, he said.

Source: FAPESP
  • Share this pageShare this page
  • Share this pageCorrect
  • ShareShare
  • AlertAlert
Reduced link: 
  • You are recommending this story: Nobel Prize-winning discovery is tested for avian influenza in Brazil
  • Fill in the following form to send your recommendation to your friend:

  • You are suggesting a correction for this story: Nobel Prize-winning discovery is tested for avian influenza in Brazil


Receba notícias do iSaúde no seu e-mail de acordo com os assuntos de seu interesse.
Seu nome:
Seu email:
Desejo receber um alerta com estes assuntos:
Respiratory disease    RNA interference    Nobel Laureate in Medicine    poultry    Helena Ferreira Lage   
Comments:
Comment
Leave your comment
Close
(Required fields are marked with an *)

(Your email address will never be published or shared.)

Enter the letters and numbers below and click in the button "send"

  • Twitter iSaúde
advertising
Informe Saúde printed version

Recommend the portal
Close [X]
  • You are recommending this story: http://www.isaude.net
  • Fill in the following form to send your recommendation to your friend:

RSS news from the portal  iSaúde.net
Get the newsletter of the portal  iSaúde.net
Recommend the portal iSaúde.net
News from  iSaúde.net in your blog or website.
Get news on the subject of your interest.
© 2000-2011 www.isaude.net Todos os direitos reservados.