Science and Technology
publicado em 11/10/2011 às 13h52:00
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Quadriplegic uses thought to move prosthetic arm in the U.S.

Tim Hemmes, 30, was able to 'play' the hands of his girlfriend thanks to a chip with electrodes implanted in the brain

 
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Foto: UPMC
Foto: UPMC
Foto: UPMC
Tim Hemmes (right) with suanamorada, Katie Schaffer (left), the brain uses to Controra prosthetic arm As part of the tests, Mr. Hemmes wanted the arm to reach a ball placed on specific areas of a plate In addition to testing the arm, Mr. Hemmes your thoughts used to guide a ball in the middle of a television screen
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Tim Hemmes (right) with suanamorada, Katie Schaffer (left), the brain uses to Controra prosthetic arm
As part of the tests, Mr. Hemmes wanted the arm to reach a ball placed on specific areas of a plate
In addition to testing the arm, Mr. Hemmes your thoughts used to guide a ball in the middle of a television screen

A quadriplegic man was able to use thought to control the movement of a prosthetic arm for the first time.

Paralyzed after suffering a motorcycle accident that damaged his spinal cord, Tim Hemmes, 30, was able to 'play' the hands of his girlfriend thanks to a chip with electrodes implanted in the brain by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh, USA.

The American is the first to participate in the project that uses a brain-computer interface (BCI) to assess whether the thoughts of a person with spinal cord injury can be used to control the movement of an external device such as a computer cursor or an arm Prosthetic sophisticated. "I put my heart and soul into everything they asked me to do. I was able to reach out and touch someone for the first time in seven years," says Tim

According to researcher, Michael Boninger, see Tim playing his girlfriend with a mechanical arm was unexpected and poignant for all involved with the project. "This first round of testing reinforces the great potential of BCI technology not only to help patients with spinal cord injuries to become more independent, but also to improve physical and emotional connections with their friends and family," explains Boninger.

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On August 25, electrode arrays were placed on the surface of the brain Hemmes during a two-hour operation.

The researchers then implanted wires under the skin of the neck to the upper chest, where they could be periodically connected to computer cables. Six days a week for the next four weeks, the team tested the technology using a computer software developed in previous studies to interpret the neural signals from electrodes senses.

After watching a computer generated figure moving an arm, Hemmes began trying to guide a ball through a big screen TV, up, down, left or right to a target within a time limit. With practice, it can perform the task without any assistance from the computer or what researchers call "100% control of the brain." He then performed a similar task with the arm reaching out to touch a target on a large panel mounted.

It was not the thought process and simultaneous movement Hemmes knew that before getting stuck which made the process possible. Instead, he imagined flexing the thumb, which created a pattern of brain signals that the computer then interpreted as "move left". "It takes concentration and patience, but this process seemed to get easier with practice, as when one learns to drive a car with a manual transmission. In future studies, Iram also testing other approaches, including participant simply thinking up down and so on, "says researcher Wei Wang.

After about eight sessions, Hemmes addressed more complicated tasks. While wearing special glasses to correctly view a three-dimensional TV screen, he moved the ball in the directions above, as well as forward or backward. He also practiced move the arm in all directions, culminating with a touch of the hand of his girlfriend.

Researchers are now analyzing data, and seek at least five adults with spinal cord injuries who have little or no use of hands and arms for further study.

Source: Isaude.net
   Palavras-chave:   Quadriplegic    Prosthetic arm    Electrodes    Chip    Tim Hemmes    University of Pittsburgh    Michael Boninger   
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Quadriplegic    prosthetic arm    electrodes    chip    Tim Hemmes    University of Pittsburgh    Michael Boninger   
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