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publicado em 03/09/2011 às 09h55:00
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Brain response that activates the frontal lobes increases risk of relapse in depression

Data show that each time a person becomes clinically depressed, the chances of recurrence increases by 16%

 
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A new study published in the journal Biological Psychiatry suggests that when people with a history of depression experienced mild states of sadness, the nature of the response of the brain can predict whether or not they will become depressed again.

The results show that patients who activate the frontal lobes are more likely to relapse than those who respond with acceptance and activate visual areas in the back of the brain.

Part of what makes the disorder so devastating is the high relapse rate: every time a person becomes clinically depressed, the chances of recurrence increases by 16%. However, the fact that some patients are able to maintain full recovery points to the possibility that differences in how they respond to the emotional challenges daily can reduce the chances of having the disease again.

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to examine this possibility, the researchers presented a sad film clips 16 patients with a history of depression before while doing tests of brain activity. During the next year, nine of 16 patients experienced a relapse. The team compared the brains of patients relapsing with those who remained healthy and another group of people who had never suffered the condition.

When faced with grief, relapsing patients showed more activity in a brain region known as the medial prefrontal gyrus. The answers in this area were also linked to higher rates of ruminative processes, tend to think obsessively about negative events. Patients who did not relapse showed more activity in the back of the brain responsible for processing visual information. The responses in this area have also been linked to greater sense of acceptance and non-judgment of the experiments.

According to the researchers, this study suggests that there are important differences in how people who have had depression respond to emotional challenges that predict the future well-being. They claim that an assessment is needed to determine whether the brain's response to grief can correctly predict the risk of a person suffering from the condition again in the future.

Source: Isaude.net
   Palavras-chave:   Depression    Relapse    Recurrence    Brain response    Biological Psychiatry   
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