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publicado em 12/07/2011 às 10h00:00
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Loyola University Hospital replaces the aortic valve using catheter

The procedure may become an alternative to open heart surgery performed today

 
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Foto: Loyola University Medical Center
Mamdouh Bakhos, um dos pesquisadres responsáveis pelo estudo
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Mamdouh Bakhos, um dos pesquisadres responsáveis pelo estudo

An intervention to replace the aortic valve of a patient at Loyola University Hospital in the United States, was performed using a catheter, a procedure that can become an alternative to open heart surgery performed today.

The heart valve disease Toni Meyer was so severe that she suffered shortness of breath even sitting in a chair. But now he says he is feeling "100% better" after doctors replaced the diseased aortic valve with a catheter in a procedure as part of a clinical trial.

Meyer, 77, of Shorewood, Ill., is among the first patients enrolled in the multicenter study that is evaluating an alternative to traditional open heart surgery for patients who have diseased aortic valve.

The catheter-based technology is called transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). It is being tested in patients with severe aortic stenosis. This disease occurs when the aortic valve of the heart is reduced, restricting blood flow to the heart to the body. The valve does not open properly, forcing the heart to work harder to pump blood. Aortic stenosis can lead to heart failure and death. About 100 000 people in the U.S. have this disease.

The clinical trial will evaluate an alternative procedure to surgery, in which an artificial valve is driven to the heart and implanted through a catheter (thin tube). The catheter is inserted into an artery in the groin and guided into the heart. Once in place, the artificial valve assumes the function of diseased valve, ensuring that the oxygen-rich blood to flow into the aorta, the main artery of the body.

The professor of medicine Mamdouh Bakhos said that surgeons replace the diseased aortic valve routinely with excellent results. "But many patients are too high risk for open heart surgery, which is the current standard. This new technology has the potential to help many patients who now have no alternative."

The device has been implanted in more than 15 000 patients in 40 countries. In the United States, is considered experimental and is only available in the trial, expected to involve over 1,300 patients. It will be a collaborative effort of cardiac surgeons and interventional cardiologists.

Read this issue in <LINK=457> (in English).

Source: Isaude.net
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