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publicado em 02/02/2011 às 02h00:00
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Intestinal bacteria regulate genes that control obesity and inflammation

Deficiency of Toll-like receptor 2 cause changes in gut bacteria that resemble animals and humans Skinny

 
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Bacteria that live in the gut may play a significant role in weight loss and gastrointestinal problems. The discovery by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine, USA.

The research team demonstrated that a deficiency of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), used by mammals (including humans) to recognize the resident microbes in the gut, leads to changes in gut bacteria that resemble animals and humans thin.

The discovery builds on previous research that showed that TLR2 deficiency protects against obesity, while at the same time, promotes gastrointestinal problems such as excessive inflammation. The new data also show that genes that control the expression of TLR2 play an important role in gastrointestinal health and weight control.

"Our work highlights the remarkable ability to reprogram an orchestrated network of inflammatory bowel to overcome significant challenges in the intestine of mammalian genetics," said researcher Richard Kellermayer. "A proper exploration of this remarkable capability can provide a means for better prevention and treatment of metabolic disorders such as obesity, diabetes and gastrointestinal disorders."

The study

To make the discovery, Kellermayer and colleagues studied normal mice and mice deficient in TLR2 using the lining of the intestine of these mice. They compared the TLR2-deficient with the normal group, as well as bacteria, the epigenome and gene expression of animals.

The researchers found that the absence of TLR2 leads to changes in the gut microbes that resemble lean animals and humans, and immunological changes similar to those observed in ulcerative colitis.

"This link gut bacteria with the expression of TLR2 opens first doors for weight control solutions to consolidate TLR2 as a drug target for obesity, and second, provide further evidence that the management of gut bacteria may be an important and effective for weight control. The challenge, of course, is finding a way to tip the scales just enough to keep weight under control without causing serious gastrointestinal problems, "said Gerald Weissmann, editor chief of the FASEB Journal, which published the study.

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Source: Isaude.net
   Palavras-chave:   Intestinal bacteria    Obesity    Inflammation    Toll-like receptor 2    Baylor College of Medicine   
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