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publicado em 01/02/2011 às 13h00:00
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Drugs used to treat Alzheimer's may increase cognitive decline

Results may have implications for researchers who are working on testing new drugs and biomarkers

 
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Drugs prescribed to treat mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) was associated with greater cognitive decline in a group of patients followed for two years. The conclusion is a study led by researchers at the Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California (USC), the United States.

The results may have implications for researchers who are working on testing new drugs and biomarkers and are not intended as a test of drug efficacy.

Lon Schneider, professor of psychiatry, neurology and gerontology at the Keck School, was the principal investigator of the study. The survey described the outcome of patients enrolled in Neuroimaging Initiative Alzheimer's Disease (ADNI) launched by the National Institute of Health in 2004 and who were already taking cholinesterase inhibitors and glutamate - blocker memantine.

Schneider had the cooperation of Michael W. Weiner, professor of medicine, radiology, psychiatry and neurology at the University of California at San Francisco.

"Patients already receiving anti-dementia drugs when they entered ADNI showed a worsened cognitive in clinical evaluations over two years than those not receiving these drugs," said Schneider. "The findings are a warning to researchers planning and interpretation of clinical trials and biomarker studies. In designing new trials to test drugs or biomarkers, researchers must take into account the effects of patients already taking drugs."

"We should not attempt to draw conclusions about the effectiveness of drugs from this study because it was not designed for this purpose. It was an observational study," said Schneider. "This study is not intended to inform physicians and consumers about the use of these drugs. This would require long-term treatment trials at random."

The study found that among patients with MCI who were enrolled in ADNI, almost half of those who were taking a cholinesterase inhibitor showed a decline in cognitive abilities to a greater extent than those who were not being treated.

Among patients with more severe - in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease - nearly half of those who were taking a cholinesterase inhibitor and memantine did worse than those who took only one of these drugs.

France

Source: Isaude.net
   Palavras-chave:   Cognition    Mild cognitive impairment    Alzheimer disease    Biomarkers    Drug   
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