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publicado em 24/11/2010 às 20h00:00
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Component of citrus fruits may lead to dietary treatment for diabetes

Results showed that naringenin mimics the action of two drugs already exist to protect the liver

 
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A survey conducted at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, in Israel and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), the United States revealed that naringenin, an antioxidant derived from the bitter taste of citrus fruits, could break new ground in developing a food supplement for treatment of hyperlipidemia (high levels of blood lipids), type 2 diabetes and other metabolic disorders.

Results showed that the substance mimics the action of two drugs already exist to protect the liver.

The naringenin activates a family of small proteins, called nuclear receptors, which cause the breakdown of fatty acids in the liver, increasing sensitivity to insulin, a process that naturally occurs during long periods of fasting.

The researchers said the substance appears to mimic the actions of other drugs such as fenofibrate, which lower lipid levels, and anti-diabetic Rosiglitazone, only offers the advantages of both.

"It's a fascinating discovery," said the paper's senior author, Yaakov Nahmias. "We have shown the mechanism by which naringenin increases two important pharmaceutical targets, PPAR and PPAR, while a third block, LXRA. The results are similar to those induced by a long period of fasting."

The liver is the main agency responsible for regulating the levels of carbohydrates and lipids in the blood. After a meal, the blood is loaded with sugar, which activates LXRA, causing the liver fatty acids to create the long-term storage. During fasting, the process is reversed, the fatty acids are released by fat cells, activating PPAR in the liver and are broken down into ketones. A similar process involving PPAR, increases insulin sensitivity.

"It's a process that is similar to the Atkins diet, without too many side effects," said Martin L. Yarmush, an author of the study. "The liver acts as if fasting break fatty acids instead of carbohydrates."

"A dual antagonist for PPAR and PPAR, such as naringenin, has been sought by the pharmaceutical industry, but its development was hampered by security issues. Notably, naringenin is a dietary supplement with a clear safety record. Evidence suggests that she can really protect the liver from damage, "said Nahmias.

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Source: Isaude.net
   Palavras-chave:   Naringenin    Citrus fruits    Diabetes    Hebrew University of Jerusalem    Yaakov Nahmias   
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