Public Health
17.09.2013

Avian influenza may resurface in the next flu season, says FAO

International experts recommend continued vigilance and a restructuring of markets to combat the threat

Foto: Wilson Dias/ABr
Fiscal health examine farm chickens to prevent bird flu. Organization recommends continued vigilance and a restructuring of markets to combat the disease
Fiscal health examine farm chickens to prevent bird flu. Organization recommends continued vigilance and a restructuring of markets to combat the disease

The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) launched a worldwide alert, stating that the bird flu virus can reappear in the next flu season.

The FAO said that the H7N9 and H5N1 viruses continue to pose a serious threat to the health of humans and animals. International experts recommend monitoring and restructuring of markets to combat the threat.

The FAO's chief veterinary officer, Juan Lubroth, said that the world is more prepared than ever to respond to an emergency with the bird flu virus. He also talked about the importance of monitoring the health authorities.

"Vigilance is essential. Veterinary services have to have the knowledge that H5N1 still has a lot of activity in parts of Asia and Egypt. And now we have the problem of H7N9, which has the same character virulence."

Lubroth cited that the bird flu virus still affects poultry. In your opinion, is necessary to continue efforts to combat viruses, not only in the most affected countries, but also in neighboring states with strong trade links.

He also said that the scenario may become more severe in relation to H7N9, as it does not cause any clinical signs in birds, making it difficult to detect.

The FAO and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) says that more work is needed to combat the virus. In the short term, this includes continuous surveillance.

According to the organizations, the emergence in combating the problem serves as a warning that the new disease threats do not represent an exception, but rather a predictable consequence of events.

Still on the long struggle against the H7N9 and other viruses, FAO and USAID want countries to invest in improving the system of buying and selling birds.

Source: Isaude.net